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's take a look at how markets are trading. stoxx europe 600 is down about .6% this morning, this after word that house speaker john boehner's plan b didn't come to a vote last night. he couldn't get them in place apparently. we'll have plenty more on the impact of that on the program. not much here, we see decliners well outpacing advancers. the ftse mib in italy down .6%. the ibex down .4%. the dax selling off .5% lower than yesterday. same goes for the ft. if it is, down .8%. 5909. how quickly we've gone from talking about 6,000 to talking about 5,900. the german bund rallying. same goes for the uk. we're seeing a rotation into safety, out of risk and out of spain and italy. about 4.5% for italy. thin trading in markets is exacerbating the move that we're seeing as we approach the year. today, the austy dollar is weaker against the u.s. dollar by about .4%. proxy there for global growth prospects. the dollar/yen is weaker by about .25%. this as markets digest the news out of the boj and gauge whether they'll be successful in boosting inflation ultimately. the euro/dollar, 1.3221. so
20 years. so look, and a lot of this is down to problems, i guess, in europe, right? what is the outlook with what happens with global growth and what is happening? >> unsurprisingly, the volume of growth of trade are strongly correlated to the volume of growth. so growth slows down. trade slows down with a sort of multiple. that's the main reason. there may be other marginal reasons like, for instance, difficulties in trade finance. which is a sort of the aftermath of the financial crisis. but the reality is that the main export market of the senate, which is europe, is not doing well. the second export market is not doing that well. not to talk about japan. so this has a slowdown effect which reverb rates on the growth of emerging countries. >> and i know when you see what's happening in italy, will this, the political developments in italy that cause more instability and less reform there, are you concerned that will have a further destabilization impact? >> no. i mean, i think it comes at a time where we are starting to see an exit, a crisis exist by europe. whether th
, but a change. you were bullish in the u.s. saying i'm going to europe and other areas. why? >> well, maybe it's controversial when you look at the headlines in europe and asia and elsewhere in the world, but our thesis is predicated primarily on what we call price matters, which is essentially evaluations so when you look at the u.s. markets, and in our opinion, u.s. markets are still relatively attractively valued because they are, on our models, 20% below long term return trend sot force of reversion works in your favor, but if you look at efa, it's further below the long term trend, 35%-40% below the long term trend, and history coral lates to strong adjusted returns over the next decade. you know, that's the long term view op places like europe and asia. the shorter term view is that our tool set for tactical moves is don't fight the fed or the trend, be aware of the crowded extremes, and like in the u.s. where the fed is on a risk market side, that's true in the ecb, a huge change. the change in the ecb leadership and the embracing of american style qe is a big reason why we went from st
on the fiscal cliff. equities falling on wednesday in the u.s. on thursday when we opened here in europe, yesterday we saw a relatively stable markets. we closed out on a flat to slightly higher note for most of our european markets yesterday. this morning coming into trade, we're pretty flat. we've taken a bit of a dropdown on this drop but we're just a couple of points lower. in the asian session overnight, we managed to see gains back again. they lost again on the notion of the fiscal cliff not happening. shanghai composite higher by just over 1% in today's session. hang seng, and the kospi closing slightly higher across the board. the european markets mixed, but the ftse 100 still flat to higher. we're all looking towards these fiscal cliff negotiations. at the moment, we've got a couple more days of trade before we get to the end of the new year, as well. most analysts out there, they've been saying we're going to see a relatively flattish end to the year from where we are now given that we've seen such an increase of equities in the past 12 months. we've seen stellar outperformance
in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the cliff. that's what they think. they think that you favor -- >> just for the record since we're on tv. that's silly if they think that they shouldn't be ceos. >> it doesn't really matter. that's what they think. >> i want you to walk me up to that moment. >> behind the record. i like that too. >> i'm stuck. like grover is stuck with this pledge he made everybody take which is that they have to go over the cliff beca
for the economy. and the transaction tax is being taken very seriously in europe and probably will happen there, even though the u.k. is kicking and screaming because they specialize in being the home of trading, whether trading in stocks or derivatives or anything else. they simply do not want that to be taxed. there are people in congress. i think wall street is now the number-one contributor to political campaigns. at least, it is in the running for number-one. i have been to washington many times and i'm involved with several groups that are trying to reform the business sector so that it can work, so that it can survive. it is very difficult because of the sheer amount of money that the finance sector in particular is pouring into lobbying and campaign contributions. it is very difficult. >> let's give a round of applause for lin. -- lynn. [applause] there is an opportunity for you to purchase and have the but signed. if you have court-further questions, she will be here signing books. thank you all and have a safe trip home. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [caption
previously thought, although the session still looks very much on course for another quarter here for europe. the pmi will rise above 50 that divides growth between contraction. hasn't stopped the euro/dollar from hitting a one and a half month high. i suppose we know growth is going to be anemic, but if spanish banks are getting some money, are we feeling slightly better? >> that's what euro trades on, isn't it? pmis are all very interesting for the economist. but they want bigger stories. most of the news flow, it's helpful to the euro. people have been trying to affect this rally for a while. we are close to those october highs. the news flow has been good, i would say. >> we hit, what, nearly 131.80? >> before that, we go 131.40. the enthusiasm for euro is surprisingly good. we're surprised by how far this rally has gone on pretty thin news sometimes. >> i just want to recap what we've got. eurozone finance ministers meeting in brussels. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in
next month. tech stocks fall in europe after ericsson unveils a swedish crown writout related to its loss chip venture. >>> reports say the intercontinental call is in talks to buy euro next. >>> and vows to continue the current government's battle against japanese territorial claims. >>> japan's central bank has decided to extend its asset purchase program to $120 billion. it will review the bank's stance on price stability next month. abe has been putting pressure on the boj to raise its inflation target to 2% as part of efforts to fight deflation. for more on the fallout or the impact here, let's talk to luca from asia pacific. you look like you're in mourning here, but it sounds like the bank of japan has delivered pretty much what the market was looking for the. >> yes. it was delivered in order to be seen as losing independence after the campaign, very aggressive campaign from the ldp party on the bank of japan independence. actually, what -- the only policy they didn't really try, according to ldp, was being extremely aggressive, not as -- or much more aggressive than what the
. europe has also been a blend of red and green as the ft names ecb chief the person of the year. we're going to kick off with breaking news. for that would, we go to david faber. >> news on best buy, in the news yesterday. the stock up sharply. what we can tell you right now is the board of directors of best buy, and its founder, richard schultz, has been trying to put together a group to essentially buy the company in a go private transaction, have extended the deadline in which he would need to come with a bid for best buy and created a window in fact that will begin on february 1st next year and end with the end of that month on february the 28th. giving schultz the opportunity to look at not just christmas sales, but the end of their fiscal year, which will end at best buy on the 31st of january. and that window, again, will be 28 days long giving him an opportunity to continue to try to cobble together a bid with private equity firms and those who might finance a potential bid for the company at whatever price that might come at, if it were in fact to come at all. no word in te
been a resurgence of developed markets, europe particularly, and investors who left that market, that's been a great place to be for the last few months. there's so much focus on fiscal cliff. i think that's very hard to do on a day to day basis. for multiasset portfolios, the rest of the world is a good story right now. >> because we're so dominated by these issues in washington. rick santelli, some enthusiasm going on in these markets today with the anticipation of perhaps a deal. do you buy into it? is that what you're seeing in chicago? >> first of all, there are many expecting a deal. down in chicago, we don't just hope for a deal, we hope for a reform-oriented deal. to just do a deal without tagging it to reform is just going to make more of the same at some future date. the treasury complex really, really unfazed by just about all of it. briefly, we're under a 158 yield. haven't been there since second week in november. after 815, 118,000 jobs, interest rates were never as high as they were before that number. that really set part of the stage for treasuries. >> and you guys do
, more green than red on the board today. by three to two, gainers outpacing losers. now, europe was closed yesterday. there was trading in the u.s. it was a weaker session. that move did extend to some parts of asia overnight. interestingly enough, the shanghai composite down .6%. the hang seng was higher on the day. the nikkei adding .9%. the kospi was up even though south korea growth projections were lowered. european markets as we look across the major bourses give you a sense of the action we're seeing in the xetra dax which is about to have its best year in seven years, something like that. the ibex 35 is rallying as we get a further sense of how little value bon can i a has. the ftse mib is moving higher, too, adding about .1%. take a quick look at the bond space, the yield for spain and italy is moving higher today. but roughly as relevance we've seen predominating over the last couple of weeks. that is around 5.3% for spain. 4.5% for italy. we did see guilds moving about 3% level. now back below 1.9%. stick around because straight ahead, we get a view from one economist
encouraging news on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selefti dveault" thanks d to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no deal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bob. nice to see you again. >> thanks, susie. >> susie: so investors and traders really do seem to think that a deal is coming, like our previous guest, roger altman. is this rally all about hopes for a deal or something nore fundamental? >> it is about hope for a deal. the malaise and the lack of confidence and the uncertainty has been pervasive, as you well know, susie. that has held corporations back from doing things, from spending money, and some individuals as well. as roger said a few minutes ago, if we can clear the air with some sort of fiscal cliff deal, i think that does lift the opportunity for t
in yesterday's rally. we didn't get housing starts, that's earlier today. as for the picture in europe, really the stand outout here is the euro. greece getting a five notch upgrade at the s&p. our road map this morning starts with gm. government motors no more. the treasury to exit its stake in the next 12 to 18 months, purchasing 2 million shares by the end of this month. >> another challenging quarter for fedex with the blame squarely on sandy. but the stock is up pre-market. >> oracle posts a strong quarter with even stronger guidance. the season rebound in europe. no impact from the fiscal cliff. >> and ge gets boosted from ubs's key call list on the weaker than expected macro environment. still on the list is including -- well tell you in a couple of minutes. >> general motors is up sharply in the pre-market session. the treasury department says it intends to sell the rest of its stakes in gm in the next 12 to 15 months. the automaker will buy back 200 million shares from treasury for $27.50 a share. treasury says it plans to sell its other remaining shares through various means in an or
hikes, europe's grand experiment with taxing the rich more is falling apart, especially in france and britain. and here at home, california and new york are passing through the 50% tax rate barrier. is anybody looking at how tax hikes fail the test of economic growth? >>> back here in the u.s., could it be michigan which used to call itself the worker's paradise union state is now moving towards new anti-union right-to-work legislation and it looks like it's going to pass? but first up, budget talks resume between speaker john boehner and president obama today. with just 25 days to go, let's keep tabs on where we stand. reports of a conservative backlash against speaker boehner simply not true. he has the solid support of his leadership and the rank and file. but there is concern among some in the gop that they are at risk of becoming the party for rich people while president obama and democrats stake their claim on the middle class. and my tax rate flexibility with higher -- here's what the president said earlier today. >> i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevent pr
the actual global land scape is looking like from europe to here in the u.s.? >> well, i just spent two weeks in europe, and i don't think things are as bad in europe as a lot of people do. liz: why not? >> the politicians, the bankers and the bureaucrats are the same in europe as they are here. they don't want to lose their jobs, and they're going to continue to paper over this and try to buy time just like we did in our fiasco in '07, '08 and '09. david: david, on the other hand, some people would say what they're doing is stunting growth, raising tax rates, something that may stunt our growth as well. you say that this bull market is overbought right now. it's about to end. why and how sharp a correction are you expecting? >> well, we believe that the high of 12 weeks ago was probably the high for the whole recovery cycle the that started in march of '09. remember that the u.s. stock market was the only market in the world that made a new high this year. we were the best looking house on a very bad looking street. and we believe that the market is overvalued perhaps 20-30%, but we also bel
're cleaner than europe is right now. >> right. >> so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following, that if the republicans and democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff you will need an external force, a major market sell-off, you will need a major economic trauma to get them to poex. >> other things have been on the table. i want to talk to our viewers about a few of those as soon as we come back. coming up next, republicans want a new formula for inflation. it's called chained cpi. not a bad idea overall but it could slow the payments to social security recipients. the president has said he could agree to it but democrat lawmakers say no way. [ male announcer ] it's simple physics... a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be difficult. prescription celebrex can help relieve arthritis pain so your body can stay in motion. because just one 200mg celebrex a day can provide 24 hour relief for many with arthritis pain and inf
of markets look a little bit like this. here is europe to begin with. only a few markets are open there today. among those closed include spain and germany. we're start with asia. shanghai composite is the outperformer. you saw up 1.6% there. here is a list of the markets closed across europe. germany, switzerland, germany and austria. for the bourses that are open, we can take a look at performance this morning and then we'll take a look over at the bond wall. the ftse 100 is down about .4%. ibex down .5%. not a clear picture. definitely mixed trade as people look to close out the year. the bond wall gives the sense for what kind of wall dominates. we're seeing bond yields move higher. investors are exiting the asset class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading sessions. for more on what to expect from markets today, we're joined by chris meyer, managing director and chi
morning. all right. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washing
are you able to do so well in europe compared to america? is that just an example of you weren't disciplined in europe and you got a lot of business? i'm trying to understand. europe is harder right now than america. >> exactly. that underscores the point that what we do nobody else can do. we want to make the offer when your wallet is out of your pocket not six months after you leave the store. you can go look in the filing cabinet that oracle or s.a.p. or microsoft has and that's the 20th century. we're all about doing things in realtime. we make you that offer when your wallet is out and your credit card is in your hand. nobody else can do that. that's a universal big data realtime problem that only tibco can solve. >> you mentioned oracle and s.a.p. and analysts that i checked in with say that ibm has come on very strong. >> ibm is our strongest competitor. we beat them every single time in terms of technical performance. they do have strong relationships and at the end of the day we have to be three years ahead of the competition and we believe we are. >> okay. you had 25
keeps rates unchanged. europe continues to hang in there economically. >> and nat gas gets a boost. the government finds exporting it is better than keeping it here at home. >> apple as we mentioned in the spotlight today, shares of the tech giant coming off their worst day in four years, sliding back into bear market territory. the one day loss erased nearly $35 billion in market cap. that chunk is bigger than 400 other s&p 500 companies. apple ceo tim cook talked to nbc's brian williams in our rock center exclusive. >> why can't you be a made in america company? >> you know, this i found, as a matter of fact, the engine in here is made in america. and not only are the engines in here made in america, but engines are made in america and are exported. the glass on this phone is made in kentucky. so we have been working for years on doing more and more in the united states, next year, we will do one of our existing mac lines in the united states. >> you can see the entire interview with tim cook tonight on rock center, that's 10:00 eastern time on your local nbc station, but for now
. >>> and corporate news weighs on sentiment across europe. kpn shares fall after dividend and greco stocks plunges as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's
, but we are cleaner than europe is right now. so we haven't felt it. my main worry is the following. if the republicans and the democrats can't get together to solve the fiscal cliff, then you will need an external force, you will need major market selloff. you will need a major economic trauma to get them to focus. >> there are other things that have been on the table. i want to talk about a few of those, as soon as we come back. coming up, the republicans want a new formula for inflation, it's called chained cpi, it could slow the growth in payments to social security recipients, that's got some people mad. the president has said he could agree do it, but democratic lawmakers say no way. [ bells dinging ] ♪ hark how the bells, sweet silver bells ♪ ♪ all seem to say throw care away ♪ ♪ from everywhere, filling the air ♪ [ female announcer ] chex party mix. easy 15-minute homemade recipes you just pop in a microwave. like caramel chocolate drizzles. happier holidays. chex party mix. happier holidays. santho, ho, ho!anta! santa! want to see some magic? watch this! merry c
deal or not. futures are up and the dow gained 100 yesterday. but there is room for skepticism. europe's grappling with the same question helped by some decent uk inflation data today. and a t-bill auction in spain. our road map begins with what appear to be significant progress in the debt negotiations overnight. a whose proposal looking to raise rates for those making more than $400,000 a year. but senator corker on squawk just poured a bucket of ice water on those hopes. >> whitney boosts her recommendations on citi, bank of america and discover financial. is that move by one of the more famous financial bears, a sign of a new era for banks? >> walmart is once again the target of a "new york times" investigation. but does the paper add anything new and can the stock outperform just as it did last time. >> private equity firm server said it will sell the firearms conglomerate. is private equity talking about guns in the country. >> futures moving higher on optimism. the white house republicans rising above partisanship, getting closer to striking a deal on the fiscal cliff. we have t
data showing the private sector has expanded for the first time since april and signaling europe could avoid a recession in q4. >>> and japan's business sentiment sours in the fourth quarter. this reading comes two days before a nationwide vote that suggests it will hand the ldp position a landslide win. >>> we're going to give you all the latest results from the flash december data for the pmi for the eurozone that we're just getting out. the overall, the deposit is a touch stronger for the month of december. the details show the manufacturing weakened slightly and its services strengthened slightly. they are overall still in negative territory. and we're seeing the euro/dollar respond a little bit to the downside. down about 0.01% trying to fight back into flat on the day. 130.75 is the level there. again, the services pmi is at 47.8. compared with the 47 that was expected. it's a five-month high. the manufacturing pmi, 46.1. the manufacturing all told, 46.3. that's a bit under the poll of 46.6. with more on the reaction to these figures, we have rob doddson with us. rob, welcome. it
china and europe and japan are having major problems of their own. that could affect the way they do business with us. joining us is to talk about, ed, good to see you. biggest problem some of these governments to stimulate their economies, die let's just print a bunch of money. that has catastrophic events with them and even with the united states that may tried traded with them. >> that seems to be just to print money. that is not how it works. when somebody prints money, it's devalues their currency which makes anything they want to export or anything that they are importing more expensive. that is why your food is more expensive because we imported a lot of that. that is why energy is more expensive because we import a lot of that. if every country is doing that, its race to the bottom how quickly they can devalue their currency. >> we trade with so many different nations. we trade with europe and certainly with china. look at our trade imbalance and you can figure that out. europe has only a handful of countries that are doing decently? >> there is about six. they are in the nor
talked about that ubs story. that's a massive, massive fine. one of the biggest banks here in europe. yes, there have been a lot of press speculation about the side of the fine, but it's three times bigger than the fine ba barclay's was fined. ubs also admitting to criminal wro wrongdoing in japan. >> how are global markets doing at this hour? >> well, actually global markets are up. they're cheering, you know, the fact that there could be a fiscal cliff deal between democrats and republicans. look, we've got european markets close to year highs, the cac and dax at 52-week highs. this is more related to the expected aggressive monetary easing by the boj, but even the u.s. markets, the s&p 500 at a two-month high. >> i'm curious, we never really know how the fiscal cliff conversation plays out overseas. is it something that moves the needle in the markets in europe and asia? >> absolutely it does. given that, you know, in terms of european risk, everything pretty much done and dusted. we don't have much more european event risk until the end of the year, this is what we're focusing on. eve
? it is africa. the route is from south america to africa, to europe. where is the new al qaeda organizations? where are they budding? where are they really being troublesome? witness benghazi, northern and western africa. that's where we fear al qaeda is taking root. what is the biggest fear? biggest fear is al qaeda northern africa and western after africa will become drug dealers. part of that cocaine movie in south america to europe getting the proceeds and thereby funding their terrorist activity. jump cut to this case involving these three men from maly. operating in maly and ghana. our d.n.a. informant contacts one of the local thugs who is said to have some association with al qaeda and says hey, guy, i have got a coke deal. i have got to get cocaine, tons of cocaine from south america here to maly and guana and south africa and up to europe. you al qaeda help me. you al qaeda will become part of my drug empire. >> operation. >> so what happens is the guy was not an actual drug dealer. he was a sting, a dia operator. the main contact point the guy thought to have some communication wi
at what's been happening in europe, you'll see a similar story there. actually a little stronger gains. in france, the cac up by about two-thirds of 1%. in germany, the dax up by 0.4% and ftse in london is up by a quarter percent. in asia overnight, you did see the hang seng down by about 1.2%. shanghai composite down, as well, down by 1%. in consider rea, the kospi up by 0.6%. oil prices have been a little weaker. down by about seven crept cents. and ten year note yielding 1.61%. that's been stuck in a tight range for quite a while. take a look at the dollar this morning. you'll see the euro at this point is still above 1.30, 1.3029 even though the dollar down across the board. dollar-yen at 82.10. gold prices this morning are up by about $8. as the fiscal cliff approaches, we're wondering what we can expect from the markets. our guest hosts again barry knapp and richard bernstein. barry, you're concerned about the direction the talks have taken. >> yeah, it's interesting as i actually traveled through europe last week, there is all this focus on the timing of getting a deal. but ther
over europe but the president thinks you can tax-and-spend your way to prosperity. >>neil: what the administration throws back on the issue is take a look at italy and greece, austerity has worked. you say what? >>guest: they have a strange definition. alwaysst either to them means higher taxes in europe and the united states austerity means less spending. i am in favor of the right definition of austerity. the balkan countries got out of the mess and now they are doing well economically because they cut, not just cut spending in the washington sense of increasing it at a slower rate they spent less one year after the other and now they are out of the trouble. if you understand the right definition of austerity is the way to go, the problem is in most of europe it means higher taxes, obama wants to give us the bad part of europe, without the good part. >>neil: thank you very much. they are not cutting anything. just slowing the growth. rebound and former president bill clinton hitting the links. this is a photo from last year. what we don't know what was said teen them this year
and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11,000 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it
rating. i've warned you over and over about the economic storm headed our way partly because of europe and this fiscal lif, but i've also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable, but every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being doing. john king, ken rogoff and diane swan, chief economist at mezaro financial. john, right now, this is more politics than the economy. some people are saying don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done. an 11th hour deal. john, as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> i see both sides digging in. you've just played the president saying i want that rate hike. the republicans are saying mr. president, we'll give you the revenues, but not through a rate hike, but the president believes he won the election and he's upped the ante. says he wants twice as much in tax revenues than a year and a half ago, so the president believes he has the higher ground. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper tr
a sense of europe. they have got to find a way to work out all of their differences to save the euro. i believe they will. you can see it and feel it. they will find a way. they will muddle through, but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us. test included a discarding of the old nation of communique's on issues about which we disagreed and patched over with language that was always misinterpreted and establishment of the arms control, human rights and -- human rights, arms control, regional issues and bi-la salle rail -- bilateral issues. it meant we didn't trade one interest for another. it was interesting how quickly people would say if the soviet union does something we don't like let's make them pay with a u.s. interest. as we got away with that with the new negotiating approach and made our way to geneva, we arrived with some sense of things being very different in the soviet union. one of the preparatory trips we had met with the one member who said, you know, as new leaders when we got to be in charge the cupboard was bare. i'm not sure a lot
the difference between the u.s. and europe has produced almost no innovation. we produce almost all of it. we pulled their growth rate up because of the success in the united states. >> eliot: jeff, i'll get to you in ten seconds. if taxes were 100%, people would theoretically sit at home. when we're talking about a rise from 35% to 39% -- >> they sit at home in europe. >> eliot:, here we have a database to say what has happened when we move them marginally from 35% to 39.6%. they were created when the rates were at 39.6%. i don't see the causation. >> i think your viewers have to be very aware of the nature of these academic studies. there have been leading economists who have looked at this inside and out. the congressional research service, i believe was asked by the republicans to take that down. they cannot find a correlation between higher tax rates and slower economic growth. just let me finish, okay? clinton raised the tax -- people like feldstein and barro to do the arithmetic will undermine economic growth, be pr
before that, announcements to spur tit in europe p so buy into the feds, sell on it. people have been asked by playing inflation here. let me give you heavy volume in the pro share short treasury, tbt. twice the inverse of the treasury. got to be careful with this because it can only get results on a one-day basis. but a lot of people, maybe inflation will be an issue in 2013. >> sure, absolutely. >> it wasn't in 2012. but this trade is a big one. if it ever happens it is a huge trade. >> it is important to mention that that eta is twice the inverse. >> and it doesn't correlate on the long-term basis. only on daily basis. be careful. >> thanks, bob. appreciate it. >> this week i paid a visit to blackrock's trading floor. first time cnbc has been allowed access there, in fact. we got their outlook for 2013. blackrock president robert kapito oversees the firms as pepts here is what he said about the fiscal cliff and beyond. >> when you say they will take it to a crisis, does that mean we go over the fiscal cliff? >> there is a very high likelihood that it does or be at 11:59 on december
of the things that has happened since 1989 is the region called eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries will longer have anything in common with each other except for the common memory of communist occupation. >> more with anne applebaum, tonight at 8:00 on a "q&a." >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the latest in the so- called fiscal cliff negotiations, we are joined by stand from -- stanley collender, and we also have josh gordon. thanks to you as well. stan, you were on last week and we ask you for the percentages. you put the chance of a fiscal cliff getting done at. this week? -- gettguest: i think there is o chance other than new year's day, and even that might be overstating it a little bit. right now i am seeing a 75% chance that they will go over the cliff. host: joshua, what odds would you give? caller: i have no idea. i would say that it could be 50 -- guest: i have no idea. i would say. the thing that americans and the public should worry about is whether they get something done soon. there is a chance that by inauguration day, something will be d
and melissa lee. questions remain about the internals. europe is reacting to a miss on german industrial production and some reports at least that some ecb members favored a rate cut yesterday. our road map will go like this. that puzzling jobs number beating virtually every wall street estimate as the labor department says sandy had only a minimal effect. is it true a clean number and what are conspiracy theorists saying. >>> a comment hastings made last july. what does it say about s.e.c. rules and whether they are out of date. >> mcdonald's will post same store sales on monday gets an upgrade to buy taking the forecast to a street high after surveying franchisees. we begin with november jobs number. 146,000 nonfarm jobs added last month above forecast of 80,000. october and september payrolls were revised lower. unemployment rate fell by 0.2 to 7.7. that's the lowest in four years. the dip occurring mostly because more people stopped looking for work and were not counted as unemployed. as for hurricane sandy, the labor department says the storm did not substantively impact the novembe
the slots at heathrow. those remain the crown jewel in terms of the airline business going over to europe. if you have access to those slots, it's a much easier way to become profitable or increase your profits over in europe. by the way, there are 31 daily flights between the uk and north america. we'll find out exactly what happens in terms of frequent flier redemption possibilities between delta and virgin atlantic. remember, virgin atlantic is not part of any global alliance, not part of the sky team alliance, although many wonder if that's going to change with some time. take a look at shares of delta. richard anderson has had a nice little move here. some people would say, listen, this is all about jet fuel as it has moderated. there's something else at play here. we'll be talking with richard anderson about this at 11:40, first on cnbc. we'll talk to him after the press conference announcing this deal. you don't want to miss what he has to say. this is a ceo, and we've talked about it several times, who is trying to take the steps that will help delta grow in the future. you look a
with christine lagarde from the imf. i asked about the reforms that were taking place in europe. i asked, would any of these reforms be taking place without europe being in a fiscal crisis mode? her answer was, absolutely not. unless the revolver is at the temple of the politicians with the finger on the trigger, they're not capable of summoning the collective will to tell the people that represent that they need to take steps to resolve a problem and will cause disappointment and pain to do so. my experience in the years i have had in politics was exactly that. we never would have gotten what we did in 2011 without the threat of defaulting on our debt. to think that we could put a structure in place today that perhaps we would all be comfortable with in terms of solving our long-term problems and be assured that 10 years or not that congress would not have modified that dozens of times to the response of into joints who are banging on the door and saying this is to develop much pain, we could hardly sustain a policy for months around here, let alone 10 years. if you want to fix the long-term s
. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's one thing for certain, taxes on top earners are going up. >> turmoil in italy. berlusconi throws his hat in the ring. retail sales numbers out of china, hoping the economy is in fact on an upswing. >> apple, enthusiasm. jeffreys trimming its price target to 800 from 900, as apple shares do trade lower in the pre-market. we'll start with mcdonald's, posting better than expected november same-store sales, global comps up 2.4. u.s. same-store sales up 2.5, offered by breakfast offerings, including that cheddar/bacon/onion sandwich, as melissa mentioned. jim? people are saying the u.s. maybe is making a turn here. >> i find mcdonald's is levered to new products, levered to menu technology. they do invent things. my hat's off to janet. they had thi
we gone bankrupt last year, europe would have ended. so they sent in monty to manage the situation in order for the german and french banks to get their money back. the ucb printed out -- ecb print out money used to help our banks but do not use it to finance our businesses. they give it to them buy to see buy back their debt to help french and german banks. that was monty's work. and in the meantime, our debt went up. >> reporter: and by the way, the five-star movement is number two in the polls. but he's not really a politician. he is a comedian. not kidding. he actually is a comedian. we also managed to catch up with the politician who's more serious about becoming the next prime minister, who has 30% of the votes in the latest polls, his name is mr. bercani. you know him. we'll show you that in the next hour. now it is time for your "global markets report." >>> all right. thank you very much. we are slightly weighted to the upside here. the european equity grind-up rally continues. advances outpaced decliners about 5-4. the dow jones 600, the ftse flat up three points. the dax
time off and traveled a good bit. we were in europe several times. so the guy admits, i have all this money. i didn't need to work. and i was in europe vacationing and i took out unemployment benefits any way. is that an abuse of the system? well, it is. against the guidelines for taking unemployment. the guidelines are that you have to contact five employers a week. did you contact them from paris. submit proof online and be available for work at any time. how were you going to be available when you were on a fancy vacation in europe. he obviously broke the rules. when you ask him why did you take the unemployment benefits when you obviously didn't need it? an amazing answer. here's what he said. after working for 35 years and finding myself unmr. unemployed during a deep recession. going through the unemployment process has given me a sincere appreciation for those who are doing the difficult job of looking for work as well as the dedicated professionals who administer the reemployment assistance program. how did he treat others? according to the "huffington post," scott and hi
like to the rest of the world, particularly europe where eurozone are taking drastic budget cuts and austerity measures that make our situation look tame. chris just returned from a trip to europe's capitals, including athens, and shares his experience of the complete devastation in greece currently dealing with. jared bernstein, storm former economic adviser. we don't know what the risks are of what might happen january 1st. there's a risk it could be horrible. that's all i'm saying. tell me what you saw in athens n greece when you were just there. >> i've traveled to greece quite a bit over the last few years for political work i've done there in the past. i don't know how to express it any more clearly than it was unbelievably sad and depressing. i mean, the country is in a great depression. unemployment is about 25%. unemployment among youths is about 55%. the economy contracted by 7.2% in the last quarter. those are numbers. i'll tell what you i saw which i think is more powerful. you go through different parts of greece, the greek stores closed everywhere. you go down near
. there is a terrible economy with 26% unemployment highest in europe, almost no job opportunities for young people frequentenly lead toro riots in the streets. here is leading democrat is suggesting cutting spending too quickly is a real problem. >> the european community now is concerned about all the austerity. there are many, many things you can do to reduce debt. but still have a stimulus aspect of the economy. >> experts though say europe's us aer the city a drag on the economic growth because it relies too much on taxation while failing to reign in the expansion of government. that would seem to back up a republican theme in the fiscal cliff argument. >> if we raise taxes on the top two rate, a million small businesses who employ 25% of the work force it will cost us over 700,000 jobs and reduce economic growth, lower take home pay and those things. that is a bad scenario. >> the league negotiator on the republican side of the table facing mr. obama says raiding taxes on upper -- raising taxes on upper income americans is not going to fix the problem that the country is facing. >> even the p
to happen in europe, and we don't know what's going to happen in greece and we don't know what's going to have in the euro zone and the energy needs in china and india and industrialized nations. what do you think is the biggest threat from the outside to the u.s. economy? >> the fiscal cliff. first of all i think there are issues that are beginning to improve and, you know, whether you look at the euro zone which is making progress, gradually, laboriously and certainly improving and with good numbers because if you look at thinge ia because if you look at thinge a greg gat euro zone debt, and you have political stability back now that the new team is in place so the volatility and the instability factors that are outside have reduced. the real threat that we have at the moment is really here with us and that can be addressed. >> but when you look at, i mean i understood that the european banks had sort of downsized or downgraded what they thought would be growth. you've got more than 11% unemployment in the euro zone, which is a good deal higher than here. >> yeah yeah. >> are those
are toking up. studies like this one in europe show too much marijuana affects coordination and judgment. >> one of the first and most important thing inability or reduced ability to divide one's ability. >> it's less debilitating than alcohol. canadian study shows those driving within three hours of smoking pot are twice as likely to cause a crash. >> another affect that we see are those driving under marijuana reduced ability to perceive time and distance. >> how much is too much? >> i feel we are in unchartered territory. >> the limit is five nanograms per blood sample. impairment is equal to alcohol. >> heavy users though not impaired can test positive weeks after smoking. also what you smoke and how you smoke it affects people differently. even experts don't know how much pot causes impairment. >> to say that two hits or two dosals would get me 5 nangram, it is impossible to make that. >> the compound in pot is thc, and it's stored in fat. user could test positive weeks after smoking. bottom line this is going to be argued and litigated. in alcohol we started at is 1.5 and game down
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